Titanium Joints Causing Inflammation


If you’ve ever had knee pain or hip pain and you are in your 40s, 50s, or beyond, the subject has undoubtedly come up: joint replacement. There is rarely a day that goes by without at least one client bringing up the subject. If you’re like a lot of our clients, even though joint replacement has been recommended, I’m sure you’d like to do whatever you can to prevent having the joint replaced. While I’m certainly NOT anti-joint replacement, there are important things to know prior to surgery.

1. The joint is getting replaced, but the muscles around the joint aren’t being replaced.

2. Muscles tell your bones what to do.

3. Without restoring proper muscular balance to the body after surgery, your muscles are still doing their “old” job (but now on a new joint) and other joints will most likely begin to degenerate due to compensation. 

4. Anything man-made isn’t nearly as good as anything God-made.

 

A new study shows that titanium replacement joints are actually beginning to “shed,” leaving debris in the joint and causing inflammation in some patients. I can’t imagine going through the joint replacement procedure itself, along with all the rehab that goes along with it, only to have the joint still be inflamed. If you want to know why this happens, go back and read points 1-4 again. Although the original pain is gone, the reason why you had the pain isn’t. The underlying cause was never addressed and the joints are still under the same amount of pressure as they were before. The only difference is that now you’re walking around on an artificial joint without nerve endings so your original pain is gone.

The best case scenario for a client needing a joint replaced would have been to get the surgery done and then restore muscle balance in the body by working with Egoscue. It’s a win-win. You’re not only out of pain, but you’re proactively preventing another surgery down the road by balancing out your body.

QUESTION: If you have had a joint replaced, what was your experience post-op?

 

 

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